Within employment law, regulations relating to incapacity for work and social security are becoming ever more complex. Increasingly, obligations are being imposed on both employer and employee, for example within the Gatekeeper Act (Wet Poortwachter). What do you need to include in your Action Plan? What efforts can you expect from an employee in terms if reintegration? Do you have suitable employment for a sick employee within your organisation? What can you expect from your occupational health and safety service or absenteeism specialist? What are the (financial) consequences if you are responsible for paying the excess? What can you do to prevent salary sanctions?

If you are responsible for payment of the excess, it is all the more important that your employee return to work as quickly as possible, given the financial consequences. At the same time, attention on the part of legislators for employees who switch from paid employment to receipt of an unemployment benefit has grown considerably over the past few years. Measures have already been taken in that respect. These include the introduction of the Act for the Limitation of Sickness Absenteeism and the Disability Safety Net (BeZava), on the basis of which a system of differentiated contributions was established. Regulation of absenteeism within your organisation has therefore become all the more important.

Our employment law team can call upon the necessary specialist knowledge to take away your concerns about sick employees. We can advise you on the supervision of reintegration programmes and help you avoid wage-related sanctions. Our attorneys also have considerable knowledge in the field of social security and experience with the Unemployment Insurance Act (WW), the Sickness Benefits Act (ZW) and the Work and Income (Capacity for Work) Act (WIA). We can support you in the event of objections and appeal proceedings before the Employee Insurance Agency (UWV) or the Central Appeals Tribunal (for the public service and social security matters) (CRvB).